Tag Archives: Neurosky

Troubleshooting and Mind-Reading: Developing EEG-based interaction with commercial systems

With regards to the development of physiological computing systems, whether they are BCI applications or fall into the category of affective computing, there seems (to me) to be two distinct types of research community at work. The first (and oldest) community are university-based academics, like myself, doing basic research on measures, methods and prototypes with the primary aim of publishing our work in various conferences and journals. For the most part, we are a mixture of psychologists, computer scientists and engineers, many of whom have an interest in human-computer interaction. The second community formed around the availability of commercial EEG peripherals, such as the Emotiv and Neurosky. Some members of this community are academics and others are developers, I suspect many are dedicated gamers. They are looking to build applications and hacks to embellish interactive experience with a strong emphasis on commercialisation.

There are many differences between the two groups. My own academic group is ‘old-school’ in many ways, motivated by research issues and defined by the usual hierarchies associated with specialisation and rank. The newer group is more inclusive (the tag-line on the NeuroSky site is “Brain Sensors for Everyone”); they basically¬†want to build stuff and preferably sell it.

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CHI 2011 Workshop – Opening Talk and Session 1 “Input Control” Videos Online

While CHI2011 maybe over we’re still a while away before the bbiCHI2011 workshop can officially wrap-up. For the next four weeks we’ll be releasing the videos we took of the presentated papers (see here for the full list). This week see’s the release of the opening talk Introducing Meaningful Interaction presented by Stephen Fairclough and the three talks presented during the Input Control session.

To view all four talks please click here. For guidance about session 1 talks please consult the abstracts listed below.
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Mindflex & Force Trainer at San Diego Comic-Con

If your in the vicinity of San Diego this week be sure to check out Mattel’s MindFlex and Uncle Milton’s Force Trainer at the Sand Diego Comic-Con (23/7-26/7). MindFlex and Force Trainer are brain wave controlled toys developed using Neurosky’s BCI headset + development platform. Each toy implements a simple BCI mechanic: leviatate a ball by regulating brain activity. MindFlex uses frontal theta* brainwaves to control the ball which is known to increase with attention / mental effort (e.g. focus your attention on the ball to make it rise). I imagine the same signal is used for Force Trainer though I’ve yet to confirm this. The simplicity of such a mechanic should make it relatively easy for the casual user to play with the toy without any training in modulating their braiwaves.

You can find each demo at booths #3029 (MindFlex) and #2913U (Force Trainer)

Both products are due out later this year.

* Based on descriptions of the product and the placement of the EEG sensor.

Mindflex & Force Trainer at San Diego Comic-Con

If your in the vicinity of San Diego this week be sure to check out Mattel’s MindFlex and Uncle Milton’s Force Trainer at the Sand Diego Comic-Con (23/7-26/7). MindFlex and Force Trainer are brain wave controlled toys developed using Neurosky’s BCI headset + development platform. Each toy implements a simple BCI mechanic: leviatate a ball by regulating brain activity. MindFlex uses frontal theta* brainwaves to control the ball which is known to increase with attention / mental effort (e.g. focus your attention on the ball to make it rise). I imagine the same signal is used for Force Trainer though I’ve yet to confirm this. The simplicity of such a mechanic should make it relatively easy for the casual user to play with the toy without any training in modulating their braiwaves.

You can find each demo at booths #3029 (MindFlex) and #2913U (Force Trainer)

Both products are due out later this year.

* Based on descriptions of the product and the placement of the EEG sensor.